There's No Place Like Home

© 2017, Contemporary Narrative Weavings by Bonnie Clark / Dakini Dreams, Aspens #1, Magic in the Desert: Santa Fe Reflections

© 2017, Contemporary Narrative Weavings by Bonnie Clark / Dakini Dreams, Aspens #1Magic in the Desert: Santa Fe Reflections

As the artwork comes down off my walls and the boxes start to pile up, I'm counting down the days until the movers arrive and I leave Asheville.

I'm very much a creature of habit so I'm dealing with the disruption to my life and daily routine by focusing on what I'm looking forward to when I get home to Santa Fe...

  • Welcoming each morning from my balcony, curled up in my papasan chair wrapped in my favorite quilt with a cup, or 3, of coffee;
  • Setting up a new studio space and starting new projects;
  • Friday afternoons at The Teahouse before gallery hopping my way down Canyon Road;
  • Yoga classes at YogaSource;
  • Spa days at Absolute Nirvana and Ten Thousand Waves;
  • Saturday morning breakfasts at The Teahouse before my weekly trip to Artful Tea, the Farmers' Market, and Ark Books;
  • Ceramics classes at Santa Fe Clay;
  • The smell of pinon smoke in the air on a crisp winter's night;
  • Seeing Voices of the Counterculture in the Southwest at the New Mexico History Museum again;
  • And the sunsets, always the sunsets.

I started Magic in the Desert: Santa Fe Reflections last January as a way of exorcising my homesickness for Santa Fe. But, in the end, the weavings pointed the way home. 

The Mystique of the Mother Road

© 2017, Contemporary Narrative Weavings by Bonnie Clark / Dakini Dreams, Santa Fe Sunset #1, Magic in the Desert: Santa Fe Reflections

© 2017, Contemporary Narrative Weavings by Bonnie Clark / Dakini Dreams, Santa Fe Sunset #1Magic in the Desert: Santa Fe Reflections

"The road must eventually lead to the whole world." -- Jack Kerouac

Route 66. America’s Highway. The Mother Road. The name itself conjures memories of exploration, adventure, and freedom in those of a certain age. It wasn’t just a highway. It was an experience. It was the inspiration for a generation of writers, musicians, artists, and dreamers.

During its heyday, Route 66 introduced travelers to the exotic landscapes and people of the southwest. The Spanish and Native American cultures encountered along New Mexico’s Route 66 opened up new worlds never dreamed of. It was a journey of discovery… the old Indian Pueblos, the old town plazas of Santa Fe and Albuquerque, and intriguing little towns, like Tucumcari, with unique and colorful histories.

In 1937, an act of political revenge meant to punish Santa Fe's politicians and businesses resulted in Route 66 being realigned to bypass the city. But Santa Fe had already claimed its place in the history and stories of the Mother Road.

May Your Trails Be Crooked...

“May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds.” – Edward Abbey

© 2017, Contemporary Narrative Weavings by Bonnie Clark / Dakini Dreams, Santa Fe Nights #2, Magic in the Desert: Santa Fe Reflections

© 2017, Contemporary Narrative Weavings by Bonnie Clark / Dakini Dreams, Santa Fe Nights #2Magic in the Desert: Santa Fe Reflections

Some of the finest mountain scenery in the Southwest is found in the 1.6-million acre Santa Fe National Forest. The Santa Fe National Scenic Byway originates in downtown Santa Fe at the oldest public building in America – the Palace of the Governors – and loops 15 miles through the forest to the Santa Fe Ski Basin. If you’re looking for an adventure, travel into Pecos, San Pedro Parks, Chama, and Dome Wildernesses via wilderness pack trips, saddle, or on 1,000 miles of hiking trail. Try whitewater rafting on the Rio Chama or Rio Grande. Or visit one of many nearby Indian pueblos, Spanish missions, and Indian ruins. No matter the time of year, the scenery will take your breath away. Golden aspen grace the high country from September to October and snow blankets the mountains in winter.